Signal propagation FROM source to sink
For the future of earth resources and energy

S2S-Future is a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network (MSCA ITN) funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme.

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Presentation

 

Today Earth’s surface is host to complex interactions between humans and their physical, chemical and biological environments, including sediments. These sediments have been produced, transported and deposited on the Earth’s surface over a period of at least 4 billion years. Sediments contain geological resources (water resources, energy, aggregates, metals) or may be used for the storage of various wastes (CO2, nuclear, chemical) and are therefore of primary importance for the future harmonious development of humankind.

 

The objective of the S2S-FUTURE ITN is to better predict the location and structure of the sediments, as well as their mineralogical/physical properties. This will be achieved by a full integration over a broad range of temporal scales of the sedimentary system, i.e. from the upstream source of sediment to their downstream sink, known as the source-to-sink system (S2S), to meet the Planet’s needs in times of important and rapid global climate and societal changes.

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Dragonstone 2

17 Sep 2021

Dragonstone 2

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Mid-term check meeting

24 Jun 2021

Mid-term check meeting

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3rd Network Meeting

30 Mar 2021

3rd Network Meeting

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Dragonstone 1

19 Jan 2021

Dragonstone 1

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2nd Network Meeting

16 Oct 2020

2nd Network Meeting

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Kick-off Meeting

23 Apr 2020

Kick-off Meeting

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An international research programme

 

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Presentation

S2S-FUTURE project gathers an outstanding European research and training network of 15 PhD students, hosted at world-leading academic institutions and industrial companies, whose aim is to develop the S2S paradigm as a powerful vector for understanding sedimentary accumulations as natural resources.

The project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No 860383.